Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

macwilby2

Mac Apple

The next billion is the potential PC market in the developing world. We know they won’t be
buying MACS because Apple’s Steve Job’s has admitted it won’t be worth it to his company

A lot of different companies are trying to come up with affordable PCs that businesses, families,
schools and students in developing countries can buy.

But, everyone is having a hard time pinning down just what it is they will want.

1.  What traditional features do they keep and which are kept out?

2.  Will users be offended if they feel they are getting a dumbed-down version?

3.  Would they rather share a community PC?

4.  Would they like to buy a PC they can plug into a community server?

5.  Do they want brand PCs or does it matter that it is a no-name but does the job?

6.  How much can they pay? $400, $250, $140, $70?

7.  Will it be dust proof? Mansoon proof? burglar proof?

8.  Do they need high-speed?

9.  Would they rather have a quality PC that costs more even it stretches their budget?

10. Who will teach them how to use it?

Lots of questions…

Are there solutions?

What do you think?

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

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Bill Belew

Bill Belew

Daddy and Christian.

No Comments

  • Anonymous says:

    I dont think it will be easy to generalize and say overall everyone wants it to be more cost effective or everyone wants it to be high preformance, becasue different people all want different things. Even though these are developing countries, I’m sure there are some people there who know about computers. Those people are the ones who will be offended about getting the “dummed down” version of the machine. Yet, there are still some who know nothing about the machine and learning a basic system will be plently for them to handle.
    Some company is going to have to come up with a machine, and whatever it is they come up with still wont make everyone happy.

  • mark cerezo says:

    there are many cheap pc’s out there for less than 400 dollars but you get what you pay for. a mac is worth every penny than getting a 300 dollar pc.

  • dori says:

    Some countries other than U.S.A, don’t need to be trained for the PC, they learned by knowing the computer, not only working with it, repair it as well.
    But I should admit that not many family can afford to buy a PC for their kids as American family do. We don’t know the value of what we have. We through away a good working computer because we get tired of it not because it doesn’t function right. in U.S, the cost of repair is more than buying a new PC. In some countries, they take the old one and upgrate it, not the company, the kids.
    There are places that can share PC for those who can not afford one. But they have to pay a small amount for certain time.
    Aren’t you glad that we leave in a place that we don’t worry about if we can afford it. Thanks to Credit Cards!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • dori says:

    Some countries other than U.S.A, don’t need to be trained for the PC, they learned by knowing the computer, not only working with it, repair it as well.
    But I should admit that not many family can afford to buy a PC for their kids as American family do. We don’t know the value of what we have. We through away a good working computer because we get tired of it not because it doesn’t function right. in U.S, the cost of repair is more than buying a new PC. In some countries, they take the old one and upgrate it, not the company, the kids.
    There are places that can share PC for those who can not afford one. But they have to pay a small amount for certain time.
    Aren’t you glad that we live in a place that we don’t worry about if we can afford it. Thanks to Credit Cards!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Tim Pang says:

    I think developing countries should have good computers. No one wants a computer that will collate dust over time. Good computers should have basics needs for everyday use. It should have 512 memory, MS Office, Windows XP, CD Burner and 60gb hard diver. A computer like this will coast us here around $600.

  • Jennifer Simes says:

    In developing countries, there is a huge gap between those who are technologically knowledgeable and financially capable, and those who don’t. Sometimes surveys/studies that talk about the PC market in these countries are misleading – are they talking about PCs in every household or PCs in technogically capable areas only? PCs in every household is not an accurate yardstick for PC market growth because not every one can afford it, even the “dumbed down version.” Community PCs may be the answer but again there are technical considerations to be made and there’s no profit in it.
    So this billion shouldn’t be about the machine (one can “build” a very generic PC using parts from all over, load Linux OS in it, and get as much capability as your average branded PC for a very low price), but it should be about making technology (computer hardware, software, and the Internet)accessible to the masses.

  • panasianbiz says:

    Whether developing get a pc or not and what kind they get is up for debate…one thing is for sure…everybody is aiming at them and when they do get pcs/macs to those billions…the marketers/advertisers are going to go nuts….

  • Anonymous says:

    Even Genesi ( http://bbrv.blogspot.com ) are launching a community site geared towards research in this area:

    http://www.power2people.org/

  • james roper says:

    i think it is a great idea and a way for people who would not otherwise be able to buy a computer to get one. there are a lot of questions as far as what would have to be included. different things are important to different people, so not everyone will care about the brand name or what it looks like. it would probably work best if it was a custom built, option driven program, where people add or take out what they need and don’t need. i know most computers already do this, but it can still be done on a larger scale.

  • Tommo_UK says:

    You probably don’t know this, but Apple’s Steve Jobs offered to licence Mac OS X for free to the organisation tasked with designing and producing the developing-world targeted $100 laptop. His offer was turned down on the basis that the OS is too proprietary (despite it being built on UNIX). Apparently the tech-heads in charge think Linux more suitable. Mmm sure.. Linux is after all so much easier to use, maintain, understand, and troubleshoot than OS X if you’re a villager in the middle of Africa /sarcasm/

    My only point is that Apple may not think there is a commercial opportunity in this market yet, but made a philanthropic gesture nevertheless – and a generous one too.

  • panasianbiz says:

    You are right. I didn’t know that. Thanks for sharing the info and the education.

    Jobs is always in the news in this area…I live just 5 minutes from Cupertino…but I still hadn’t heard that.

    I guess I need to get out more often.

    Thanks for dropping by and for the comment.

  • julie taylor says:

    Most of the computer owners out there have PC’s while a very small percentage, like 10%, own Mac’s. There are less programs for Mac’s and the web is mostly formatted for PC’s. People outside of the US are more likely to have NO idea what a Mac is. Also most universities all over the world have computer classes available to the public.

    I forgot what company it was, it was mentioned on MSNBC, but it sends PC computer teachers to middle eastern countries and teaches single mothers (previously unavailable to work by the talaiban rule) how to use computers and become business people.

    So yeah, PC’s are a good thing, they’re cheap and more involved with the world. Mac’s are great computers but their marketing sucks(not commercial) and they’re way too expensive for developing countries.

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